Sunday, July 18, 2010

Simultaneous Posting to Multiple Blogs

There are several applications that would make this a necessary thing to do.
I am testing out ScribeFire, a Mozilla Firefox plugin, for this particular attempt.
I am posting this to both TechHermit and to my experimental blog, but just hitting the publish button one time.
It seems like a very intuitive tool, even as I am adding hyperlinks, the tools recognizes what is in the clipboard and is ready to paste it right away.
I'll add a picture to see how it appears in both blogs, it is a slick add in feature that gives four upload options.


And here is how it will handle embed video from youtube.



Pomplamoose - If You Think You Need Some Lovin

OK, hitting publish now.
So it's not a true simultaneous posting, you do have the option of keeping the information and re-posting it to the second (or third) location right away.

For a free tool, pretty slick.  Another reason to switch to Firefox as well.

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Look What Blogger Did!

I probably missed it when it happened, but I love the changes that blogger has made to their design and template layout.


There are a few more options and a much easier drag and drop layout. Blogger just made it a little easier to have a variety of professional looks for your $0 budget blog.

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Facebook Changes...Again.

Facebook made some changes yesterday to the way pages work. They introduced "community pages" and changed some terms that you might need to change on your website as well. If your website says, "Become a Fan on Facebook" you might see how things go over the next couple of weeks and be prepared to change it to a term that matches facebook's nomenclature. You can see below that they have changed it to "like" instead.

Here is the faq section from facebook's home page on these two topics.
You can see the entire Help Center on Facebook Pages if the following doesn't provide your answer.

Community Pages
What are Community Pages?
Community Pages are a new type of Page that enable you to see what peo...
Community Pages are a new type of Page that enable you to see what people are saying about the things that matter to you, and discover the friends and people who share these connections with you. They are similar to any other Page to which you can connect, although they won’t generate stories in your News Feed, and won’t be maintained by a single author. Where available, they also show Wikipedia content for the relevant topic, which Facebook has licensed under the creative commons license.

We think your experience on Facebook will improve as your profile is turned into a living map of all the connections that matter to you, instead of a static list of your interests.
http://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=17110
How are Community Pages different from official Pages or Facebook Groups?
Community Pages are built around topics, causes or experiences. Offici...
Community Pages are built around topics, causes or experiences. Official Pages are maintained by authorized representatives of a business, brand, celebrity, or organization, and they can create and share content about the entities that they represent. Community Pages, on the other hand, won’t generate stories in your News Feed, and won’t be maintained by a single author.

While Groups allow you to communicate directly with other people on Facebook about a specific subject, Community Pages simply enable you to learn more about and see what others are saying about additional topics that interest you.
http://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=17111
Can I edit the content on a Community Page?
No. When available, we update the information and profile picture base...
No. When available, we update the information and profile picture based on the article for that topic in Wikipedia. At this time, there is no way for people who choose to connect with a Community Page to add their own pictures or edit the information.
http://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=17112
How can I tell the difference between official Pages and Community Pages?
Community Pages have slightly different content than official Pages. W...
Community Pages have slightly different content than official Pages. When available, they display a primary picture straight from the Wikipedia page of that topic, along with an info section also from Wikipedia. Related posts from other people on Facebook will also be displayed in real time.

However, since Community Pages are another type of Page, we don't differentiate between them when listed on your profile or in search results.
http://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=17113
What if there isn’t a Wikipedia article for a Community Page topic?
Community Pages are meant to be the best collection of shared knowledg...
Community Pages are meant to be the best collection of shared knowledge on topics that interest you. Where available, they show Wikipedia content for the relevant topic, which Facebook has licensed under the creative commons license.

If we can’t find the right article from Wikipedia, we might be asking for help from the community. You may see messaging on these Community Pages inviting you to make these Pages more useful and interesting by signing up to contribute in the future or by suggesting a Wikipedia article.
http://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=17138
"Liking" a Page
Why did "Become a Fan" change to "Like"?
To improve your experience and promote consistency across the site, we...
To improve your experience and promote consistency across the site, we've changed the language for Pages from "Fan" to "Like." We believe this change offers you a more light-weight and standard way to connect with people, things and topics in which you are interested.
http://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=17167
What does it mean to "Like" a Page?
When you click "Like" on a Page, you are making a connection to that P...
When you click "Like" on a Page, you are making a connection to that Page. The Page will be displayed in your profile, and in turn, you will be displayed on the Page as a person who likes that Page. The Page will also be able to post content into your News Feed.
http://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=17115
Can I still "Like" a News Feed story about my friends Liking Pages?
No. When you see a Feed story about a friend Liking a Page, there will...
No. When you see a Feed story about a friend Liking a Page, there will be no feedback links below that story. However, if you hover over the Page name, you will see a small preview of the Page and the number of other people who have also Liked that Page. You can then Like that Page to add it to your profile, or you can click through to the Page itself.
http://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=17116
Is there a difference between "Liking" an item a friend posts and "Liking" a Page?
Yes. Liking a Page means you are connecting to that Page. When you con...
Yes. Liking a Page means you are connecting to that Page. When you connect to a Page, it will appear in your profile and you will appear on the Page as a person who likes that Page. The Page will also be able to post content into your News Feed.

On the other hand, when you click "Like" on a piece of content that a friend posts, you are simply letting your friend know that you like it without leaving a comment.
http://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=17168

Thursday, March 4, 2010

Social Media Strategic Planning

My previous post on Social Media Strategic Planning received a few off and online requests for the use of the tactical matrix.

For your convenience, I uploaded the matrix, in this presentation form, to slideshare. You can download the presentation from there and feel free to re-use and re-purpose it. I'd love to know how you might adapt it and use it in a way that fits your purposes, so please keep me informed.



I found inspiration in the ongoing work of Beth Kanter, the consistent use of matrix grids by Jeremiah Owyang, and a conversation with my friend, Lance Bauslaugh.

Friday, February 12, 2010

The Matrix - Social Media Planning Tool

I have been presented with a couple of opportunities to use a planning matrix or two in the last several weeks. I was glad to see the way the Jeremiah Owyang has been using them over at his blog the in last dozen posts. We have recently been challenged with our thinking at Pursuant with a fundraising matrix that has been very helpful in our strategic planning with clients. They keep popping up.

So this frame of thinking caused me to construct the following matrix specifically geared to guide the planning of a basic social media work flow. There are plenty of comments and critiques you might make to it. I'd love to hear them.



So, based on this empty shell of a matrix, I have filled it in with sample recommendations we might make to a typical small to mid-size non profit client.
You can see the fictional parameters and constraints I have inserted. You can also see that there is an assumption that this hypothetical organization would have already jumped into facebook, twitter, blogging and youtube, without taking time to think through strategy or audience or resources. (sound familiar?)

So this might be you or your organization...


This leads us to having the freedom of turning this matrix on it's side to discover a daily task list for a single person to accomplish a cross platform engagement strategy in about 30 minutes per day. Here is what that might look like...

There is plenty to comment and critique here.
Please resist a critique of the tactics that are listed in the grid. I would much rather hear your comments on the planning tool itself.

Tuesday, February 9, 2010

Facebook Horribly Messes with Non Profits Use of Their Site.

This is an excellent post you will find on the NonProfit Tech 2.0 Blog.

I encourage you to keep an eye on the results of this test throughout next week. This could be a real disappointment for nonprofits, even those that have employed an excellent engagement strategy might find themselves severely limited in their ability to engage or communicate.

An Experiment with Facebook Advertising for Nonprofit Organizations
2010 February 9
tags: Facebook, ROI (Return on Investment)
by nonprofitorgs

The Facebook of February 2010 is quite different from the Facebook of 2009 especially when it comes to Facebook Fan Pages. If you haven’t yet noticed, three very important changes have been made that significantly effect your organization’s Facebook community:

1) Status Updates are no longer guaranteed to get exposure in the News Feed.

There is a mysterious Facebook algorithm at play here and I just don’t know what it is, but I do know that with the launch of new Facebook design in early February 2010 the vast majority of Status Updates from Pages that I am a fan of are not showing up in the primary News Feed > Top News. More are seemingly showing up in the News Feed > Most Recent view, but definitely not all. I knew this change was coming and I had read that Status Updates that receive a lot of comments and thumbs up would at the very least show up in the News Feed > Most Recent, but that’s just not happening. I have always believed and voiced that 90% of the power of a Facebook Page is in the Status Updates, so having them not show up in News Feeds is a problem.

2) It is no longer obvious that fans have new Updates.

I can’t remember exactly when this change was made, but it was at least 6 months ago. When fans logged into Facebook in the upper right of their “Home” view they used to see alerts of “New Updates!”. Now the only way fans know if they have new Updates is if they go to their Inbox > Updates or if they click “Messages” on the left of the Home view (the later was just added February 2010). Coincidently, once this change was made, activity on the Nonprofit Organizations Facebook Page declined. I no longer saw surges in traffic (via Insights) on days that I sent Updates.

As of February 2 Updates had been relegated the realm of “Out of Sight, Out of Mind”. On that day I polled fans asking if they read Updates anymore, and the overwhelming response was no. BUT now that Facebook has added the “Messages” function in the upper left of the Home view, perhaps the usefulness of Updates with rise again? I’ll send an Update next week and let you know. :)

3) The Pages Filter on the Home view has been removed and replaced with Ads and Pages.

The new Facebook of February 2010 no longer has a “Pages” filter in the upper left of the Home view. It used to be a feed of Status Updates from Pages you were a fan of. It’s gone. Now if you click “More” just below this space a new “Ads and Pages” hub appears. You do not see Status Updates, but rather the Ads and Pages you are an admin for. Useful for Nonprofit Admins who manage many Pages and people who buy and manage Facebook ads, but there’s no way around it… less exposure of Status Updates on the Home view is just not good for most nonprofits.

Thus, a $50 experiment with Facebook Advertsing for Nonprofit Organizations.

Facebook is entering an era of profitability. They have built the largest online community the world has ever known over the last 5 years and now they are positioned to make some serious cash. You can’t blame them for it. It couldn’t be free forever. That’s business. But nonprofits have sent out millions of e-mails and Tweets over the last few years asking supporters to “Become a fan!” thus helping Facebook become the powerhouse that it is today. So, there is a reciprocal relationship here, or at least there should be (I think).

I have read rumors that purchasing advertising will help your nonprofit get more action in the News Feeds. That seems fair. I am willing to pay $50 or $100 in advertising to get increased exposure in the feeds, but not necessarily to secure more fans. If those new fans can’t see my Status Updates, well then quite honestly, what’s the point?
So, I have just purchased a Facebook Ad to promote the Nonprofit Organizations Facebook Page that is to run Monday, February 15th through Friday, February 19th. Together, we will watch to see if it increases my fan base and/or Status Update activity in the News Feeds. Below you can see the steps I took to create and pay for an ad:

1) Step 1 :: Design Your Ad

Step 2 :: Target Your Ad


My ad will target people:

* who live in the United States
* between the ages of 30 and 40 inclusive
* who graduated from college
* who are single, in a relationship, engaged or married
* who speak English (US)

Facebook let me know there are 6,892,600 people that fit that description.

Step 3 :: Campaigns and Pricing

I chose to max my ad at $10 a day. For that price I could get up 17 clicks a day, or 36,000 impressions a day. The later sounded much more impressive so I went with Pay for Impressions. The ad will run for 5 days maxing at $50 starting next Monday, February 15.

Step 4 :: Review and Pay for Ad

Step 5 :: Ads and Pages Admin

As mentioned above, there is a new “Ads and Pages” option on the left side of your Home view under “More.” When the ad goes live next Monday I’ll start seeing some activity and be sure to share screenshots with you the following week. But again, this experiment is not about how many new fans an ad can generate for the Nonprofit Organizations Facebook Page, but rather if it helps the Status Updates of the NPO Page get more News Feed action. I hope so!